Fairy Tales, Nursery Rhymes & Astrotheology

Little Red Riding Hood: Little Red Riding Hood is the sun.  As the sun sets in the western horizon, the ancients always placed the scales of Libra in the western sunset where, from time to time, the sun sets with its red colors.  The scales of Libra begin right at the horizon and go 30 degrees below the horizon.  When Mama tells Little Red Riding Hood, “Don’t stop and see anybody, you’ve got to go direct,” that’s what the sun does.  Out of the 7 planets in the sky that we can visibly see, the sun is the only one that does that. The wolf comes along.  The wolf is Lupus, one of the deacons of Libra where the sun sets every day and is always on the horizon. When Little Red Riding Hood comes out of the other side of the horizon, she is saved by Orion and lives to see another day.

Snow White and the 7 Dwarfs:  Snow White is the sun as a beautiful white aura.  The undifferentiated color of the sun is one white light, which gets differentiated into 7 colors, which are the 7 dwarfs.
Sleeping Beauty: Sleeping Beauty is the Earth Goddess.  “In the myth of the Sleeping Beauty, the earth-goddess sinks into her long winter sleep when pricked by the point of the spindle. In her cosmic palace, all is locked in icy repose, naught thriving save the ivy which defies the cold, until the kiss of the golden-haired sun-god reawakens life and activity.”

Cinderella & Prince Charming: Cinderella is the dawn, Prince Charming is the sun.  Same story, different characters, different names.

4 and 20 blackbirds are the 4 and 20 hours (in a day).  The pie that holds them is the underlying Earth.  “the four-and-twenty blackbirds are the four-and-twenty hours, and the pie that holds them is the underlying earth, covered with the over-arching sky; how true a touch of nature it is that when the pie is opened-that is, when day breaks, the birds begin to sing; the King is the Sun, and his counting out his money is pouring out the sunshine, the golden shower of Danae; the Queen is the Moon, and her transparent honey the moonlight; the Maid is the ‘rosy-fingered’ Dawn, who rises before the Sun, her master, and hangs out the clouds, his clothes, across the sky; the particular black- bird, who so tragically ends the tale by snipping off her nose, is the hour of sunrise.”

“Little Red Riding Hood is the evening sun, which is always described as red or golden; the old Grandmother is the earth, to whom the rays of the sun bring warmth and comfort. The Wolf-which is a well-known figure for the clouds and blackness of night-is the dragon in another form; first he devours the grandmother, that is, he wraps the earth in thick clouds, which the evening sun is not strong enough to pierce through. Then, with the darkness of night he swallows up the evening sun itself, and all is dark and desolate. Then, as in the German tale, the night-thunder and the storm winds are represented by the loud snoring of the Wolf; and then the Huntsman, the morning sun, comes in all his strength and majesty, and chases away the night-clouds and kills the Wolf, and revives old Grandmother Earth, and brings Little Red Riding Hood to life again. Or another explanation may be that the Wolf is the dark and dreary winter that kills the earth with frost, and hides the sun with fog and mist; and then the Spring comes.”

Jack and the Beanstalk:  “The germ of the story of “Jack and the Bean Stalk” is to be found in old Hindu tales, in which the beans are used as the symbols of abundance, or as meaning the moon, and in which the white cow is the clay and the black cow is the night.

In “Beauty and the Beast,” for instance, we have the same idea. There are the three sisters, one of whom is chosen as the bride of an enchanted monster, who dwells in a beautiful palace. By the arts of her sisters she is kept away from him, and he is at the point of death through his grief. Then she returns, and he revives, and becomes changed into a handsome Prince, and they live happy ever after. One feature of these legends is that beings closely united to each other–as closely, that is, as the Sun and the Dawn–may not look upon each other without misfortune.”

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